Effect of Running Training on DMH-Induced Aberrant Crypt Foci in Rat Colon

FUKU, NORIYUKI1; OCHIAI, MASAKO2; TERADA, SHIN1; FUJIMOTO, ERI1; NAKAGAMA, HITOSHI2; TABATA, IZUMI1

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
doi: 10.1249/01.mss.0000239398.78331.96
BASIC SCIENCES: Original Investigations
Abstract

Purpose: We examined the effects of treadmill-running training on the induction of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), which is the first step of colon cancer induction, in the colonic mucosa of rats injected with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH).

Methods: Four-week-old F344 rats (N = 38) were randomly assigned to training (19 rats) and control (19 rats) groups. After a week, all rats were given DMH (20 mg·kg−1 body weight) once a week for 2 wk. Running training was started at age 7 wk (speed: 10 m·min−1, 0% grade, 120 min·d−1, 5 d·wk−1). After 4 wk of training, the rats were sacrificed and the colon was removed, opened, and counted for ACF with 0.2% methylene blue staining.

Results: Running training resulted in lower body- (P < 0.01) and adipose fat weight (P < 0.05). The numbers of ACF and total AC were significantly lower in the running training group than in the control group (P < 0.05). The occurrences of one, three, and five aberrant crypts per focus were also significantly lower in the running training group than in the control group (P < 0.05). The ratios of total AC/ACF did not significantly differ between the running training and control groups.

Conclusions: The results of the present investigation suggest that low-intensity running training inhibits the DMH-induced initiation of colon ACF development.

Author Information

1Division of Health Promotion and Exercise, National Institute of Health and Nutrition, Tokyo, JAPAN; and 2Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo, JAPAN

Address for correspondence: Izumi Tabata, Ph.D., FACSM, Division of Health Promotion and Exercise, Incorporated Administrative Agency National Institute of Health and Nutrition, 1-23-1 Toyama, Shinjuku City, Tokyo, 162-8636, Japan; E-mail: tabata@nih.go.jp.

Submitted for publication March 2006.

Accepted for publication July 2006.

©2007The American College of Sports Medicine