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Influence of Acute Exercise on Hyperglycemia in Insulin-Treated Type 2 Diabetes

PRAET, STEPHAN F.1; MANDERS, RALPH J.2; LIEVERSE, A. G.3; KUIPERS, Harm1; STEHOUWER, COEN D.4; KEIZER, HANS A.1; VAN LOON, LUC J.1,2

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: December 2006 - Volume 38 - Issue 12 - pp 2037-2044
doi: 10.1249/01.mss.0000235352.09061.1d
CLINICAL SCIENCES: Clinical Investigations

Introduction: The impact of exercise on blood glucose homeostasis has not been assessed in long-standing type 2 diabetes patients receiving exogenous insulin treatment.

Purpose: To study the effects of an acute bout of exercise on the subsequent 24-h blood glucose excursions under free-living conditions in insulin-treated type 2 diabetes patients.

Methods: Eleven male type 2 diabetes patients (59 ± 2 yr) performed an acute bout of exercise. One day before the exercise bout, a continuous glucose monitoring system (GlucoDay®, A. Menarini Diagnostics) was inserted subcutaneously in the periumbilical region. The glucose sensor continuously measured glucose concentrations in the dialysate during a 48-h period.

Results: The prevalence of hyperglycemic glucose excursions was reduced by 39% during a 24-h period (equivalent to 3 h) after an acute bout of exercise (P < 0.05). Average glucose concentrations 24 h before and after the exercise bout did not differ (NS). Mean dialysate glucose concentrations and the prevalence of hyperglycemic periods correlated strongly with baseline blood HbA1c concentrations (Pearson's R = 0.69, P < 0.05).

Conclusion: An acute bout of exercise effectively reduces the prevalence of hyperglycemia during a 24-h period under free-living conditions in long-standing type 2 diabetes patients on exogenous insulin therapy.

1Departments of Movement Sciences and 2Human Biology, Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University, Maastricht, THE NETHERLANDS; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Máxima Medical Center, Eindhoven, THE NETHERLANDS; and 4Department of Internal Medicine, Academic Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, THE NETHERLANDS

Address for correspondence: S.F.E. Praet, M.D., Department of Movement Sciences, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands; E-mail: S.Praet@mmc.nl.

Submitted for publication January 2006.

Accepted for publication June 2006.

©2006The American College of Sports Medicine