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Intermittent Exercise Test in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients: How Do the Pulmonary Hemodynamics Adapt?

LONSDORFER-WOLF, EVELYNE; BOUGAULT, VALÉRIE; DOUTRELEAU, STÉPHANE; CHARLOUX, ANNE; LONSDORFER, JEAN; OSWALD-MAMMOSSER, MONIQUE

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: December 2004 - Volume 36 - Issue 12 - p 2032-2039
doi: 10.1249/01.MSS.0000147631.59070.7D
Clinical Sciences: Clinical Investigations

Purpose: Endurance training is an important component of rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In our study, we investigated the pulmonary hemodynamics’ adaptation during a high-intensity intermittent exercise in such patients.

Methods: Eight patients underwent a 30-min exercise, alternating a 4-min work set at their first ventilatory threshold with a 1-min exercise set at 90% of their maximal tolerated power output. Pulmonary arterial pressure was measured by means of a right heart catheter. Cardiac output was calculated using the Fick’s principle applied to oxygen.

Results: V̇O2, cardiac output, and ventilation increased during the first minutes of exercise and remained stable thereafter. Heart rate increased significantly and progressively to its maximal value from rest to the end of the test (P < 0.001). After an initial increase, stroke volume decreased significantly (P < 0.05). Pulmonary arterial pressure increased from rest (mean ± SEM 23.9 ± 2.1 mm Hg) to the fifth minute of exercise (41.6 ± 2.8 mm Hg), and decreased significantly thereafter (35.2 ± 3.3 mm Hg at the 30th minute) (P < 0.001). Total pulmonary vascular resistance decreased from rest to the end of the test (P < 0.001).

Conclusion: The high-intensity 1-min bouts of work of our intermittent work exercise are well tolerated without pushing the pulmonary arterial pressure dramatically high in COPD patients.

Department of Clinical Physiology and UPRES EA 3072, University Hospital of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, FRANCE

Address for correspondence: Evelyne Lonsdorfer-Wolf, M.D., Department of Clinical Physiology and UPRES EA 3072, University Hospital of Strasbourg, BP 426, 67091 Strasbourg Cedex, France; E-mail: Eve.Lonsdorfer@physio-ulp.u-strasbg.fr.

Submitted for publication January 2004.

Accepted for publication July 2004.

©2004The American College of Sports Medicine