Cardiopulmonary and CD4 cell changes in response to exercise training in early symptomatic HIV infection

PERNA, FRANK M.; LaPERRIERE, ARTHUR; KLIMAS, NANCY; IRONSON, GAIL; PERRY, ARLETTE; PAVONE, JEAN; GOLDSTEIN, ALISON; MAJORS, PAT; MAKEMSON, DAVID; TALUTTO, CRAIG; SCHNEIDERMAN, NEIL; ANN FLETCHER, MARY; MEIJER, ONNO G.; KOPPES, LANDO

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
Clinical Sciences: Clinically Relevant
Abstract

Cardiopulmonary and CD4 cell changes in response to exercise training in early symptomatic HIV infection. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 31, No. 7, pp. 973-979, 1999.

Purpose: The purposes of the present study were to assess the effects of a 12-wk laboratory based aerobic exercise program on cardiopulmonary function, CD4 cell count, and physician-assessed health status among symptomatic pre-AIDS HIV-infected individuals (N = 28) and to assess the degree to which ill health was associated with exercise relapse.

Methods: Responses to graded exercise test, physician-assessed health status, and CD4 cell counts were determined at baseline and 12-wk follow-up for participants randomly assigned to exercise or control conditions, and reasons for exercise noncompliance were recorded.

Results: Approximately 61% of exercise-assigned participants complied (> 50% attendance) with the exercise program, and analyses of exercise relapse data indicated that obesity and smoking status, but not exercise-associated illness, differentiated compliant from noncompliant exercisers. Compliant exercisers significantly improved peak oxygen consumption (V̇O2peak; 12%), oxygen pulse (O2pulse; 13%), tidal volume (TV; 8%), ventilation (V̇E; 17%), and leg power (25%) to a greater degree than control participants and noncompliant exercisers (all P < 0.05). Although no group differences in health status were found, a significant interaction effect indicated that noncompliant exercisers' CD4 cells declined (18%) significantly, whereas compliant exercisers' cell counts significantly increased (13%; P < 0.05).

Conclusion: We conclude that although aerobic exercise can improve cardiopulmonary functioning in symptomatic HIV-infected individuals with minimal health risks, attention to factors associated with exercise adherence is warranted.

Author Information

School of Physical Education, Sport Psychology Program, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV; Departments of Psychiatry, Psychology, Medicine, Exercise and Sports Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, FL; and Vrije Universitait, Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS

Submitted for publication August 1997.

Accepted for publication September 1998.

The Aerobic Exercise Intervention Study with Early Symptomatic HIV-1 Infected Men and Women is part of an ongoing HIV program project supported by a grant from the National Institute of Mental Health (109-28-7347) to Neil Schneiderman.

Address for correspondence: Frank M. Perna, School of Physical Education, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6116, Morgantown WV 26506-6116.

© 1999 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.