Reproducibility of cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic responses to submaximal exercise: The HERITAGE Family Study

WILMORE, JACK H.; STANFORTH, PHILIP R.; TURLEY, KENNETH R.; GAGNON, JACQUES; DAW, E. WARWICK; LEON, ARTHUR S.; RAO, D. C.; SKINNER, JAMES S.; BOUCHARD, CLAUDE

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
Basic Sciences: Epidemiology
Abstract

This study determined the reproducibility of cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic responses to submaximal cycle ergometer exercise at two power outputs (50 W and 60% ˙VO2max) on each of two separate days in a sample of 390 subjects (198 men and 192 women) participating in the HERITAGE Family Study. The same protocol was conducted across 3 d in an intracenter quality control substudy which included an additional 55 subjects. Reproducibility estimates included technical error, coefficient of variation, and intraclass correlation for each of the selected variables for both subject populations. Further, since the data were collected across four clinical centers, intraclass correlations were also computed separately by clinical center. Most variables were highly reproducible, with coefficients of variation below 9% and intraclass correlations over 0.80. These results were consistent for both subject populations and across all four clinical centers. Reproducibility indicators were generally better at the higher power output. It is concluded that within-subject day-to-day variation and measurement unreliabilities are generally small compared with the between-subject variance in the response to submaximal exercise at each of the clinical centers of the HERITAGE Family Study.

Author Information

The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX; Laval University, Montreal, CANADA; Washington University, St. Louis, MO; University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

Submitted for publication May 1996.

Accepted for publication June 1997.

The HERITAGE Family Study is supported by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute through the following grants: HL45670 (C. Bouchard, PI); HL47323 (A. S. Leon, PI); HL47317 (D. C. Rao, PI); HL47327 (J. S. Skinner, PI); and HL47321 (J. H. Wilmore, PI). Credit is also given to the University of Minnesota Clinical Research Center, NIH Grant MO1-RR000400. Further, Jack H. Wilmore is partially supported by the Margie Gurley Seay Centennial Professorship, and Art Leon is partially supported by the Henry L. Taylor Professorship in Exercise Science and Health Enhancement.

Address for correspondence: Jack H. Wilmore, Department of Kinesiology& Health Education, Bellmont Hall 222, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712.

©1998The American College of Sports Medicine