Influence of fitness on susceptibility to noise-induced temporary threshold shift

KOLKHORST, FRED W.; SMALDINO, JOSEPH J.; WOLF, STACY C.; BATTANI, LISA R.; PLAKKE, BRUCE L.; HUDDLESTON, SHARON; HENSLEY, LARRY D.

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: February 1998 - Volume 30 - Issue 2 - pp 289-293
Applied Sciences: Physical Fitness and Performance

Purpose: Two earlier reports indicated that cardiovascular fitness attenuates susceptibility to noise-induced temporary threshold shift (TTS) in hearing sensitivity; however, other parameters of fitness also may be related to this phenomenon. This study investigated the association of three different physical fitness indicators on TTS.

Methods: Maximal aerobic power (˙VO2max), body composition, and recent activity history were determined in 33 normal-hearing females of various fitness levels. Audiometric thresholds were obtained at 2000, 3000, 4000, and 6000 Hz before and immediately after 10 min of exposure to 108-dB SPL narrow-band noise centered at 2000 Hz.

Results: All postnoise measurements were significantly less than prenoise measurements (P < 0.0001) with the greatest TTS occurring at 3000 Hz. Similarly, the strongest Pearson-product correlations for˙VO2max,% fat, and recent activity history with TTS occurred at 3000 Hz (r = -0.68, 0.60, -0.59, respectively; P < 0.05). Canonical correlation analysis indicated a moderate correlation between physical fitness and TTS (Rc = 0.71; P < 0.01). Individually,˙VO2max,% fat, and recent activity history had correlations of-0.70, 0.62, and -0.63, respectively, to the TTS canonical variable.

Conclusions: From these results, we concluded that there is a moderate association of physical fitness and diminished temporary hearing loss experienced after noise exposure.

School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services, Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA 50614

Submitted for publication July 1997.

Accepted for publication September 1997.

Address for correspondence: Fred W. Kolkhorst, Wellness Recreation Center 127, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0241. E-mail:fred.kolkhorst@uni.edu.

©1998The American College of Sports Medicine