Home Current Issue Previous Issues Published Ahead-of-Print Collections For Authors Journal Info
Skip Navigation LinksHome > September 1996 - Volume 28 - Issue 9 > Determinants of physical activity in obese children assessed...
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
Epidemiology

Determinants of physical activity in obese children assessed by accelerometer and self-report

EPSTEIN, LEONARD H.; PALUCH, ROCCO A.; COLEMAN, KAREN J.; VITO, DOMINICA; ANDERSON, KATARINA

Collapse Box

Abstract

Previous research has shown that predictors of activity in adults depend upon the method of measurement. This study is designed to assess the predictors of activity in a sample of 59 obese children. Activity was measured using self-reported and TriTrac accelerometer METs. Self-report and TriTrac accelerometer measures were moderately correlated, r = 0.46, with the self-reported activity (2.3 METs) significantly greater than TriTrac (1.6 METs). Hierarchical regression analysis examined the influence of socioeconomic level, body composition, fitness, hedonics of child and adult activity behaviors, and decisional balance on self-reported and accelerometer-measured activity, controlling for child and parent psychopathology. Child and parent psychological symptoms accounted for 8.3% and 3.4% of the variance in accelerometer and self-reported METs, respectively. The model for accelerometer-measured activity showed socioeconomic level and parent self-report of activity accounted for 14.8% of the incremental variance in child activity. The model for self-report of child activity found that child fitness accounted for 23.5% of the incremental variance in child activity. These results suggest that the predictors of activity level are different based upon the method of measurement, consistent with research in adults.

©1996The American College of Sports Medicine

Login

Article Tools

Share

Search for Similar Articles
You may search for similar articles that contain these same keywords or you may modify the keyword list to augment your search.

Connect With Us