Physical activity, lipids, apolipoproteins, and Lp(a) in the Northern Ireland Health and Activity Survey

MacAULEY, DOMHNALL; McCRUM, EVELYN E.; STOTT, GILLIAN; EVANS, ALUN E.; DULY, ELLIE; TRINICK, TOM R.; SWEENEY, KEVIN; BOREHAM, COLIN A. G.

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
Epidemiology
Abstract

In a cross-sectional study using a two-stage probability sample(N = 1,600) of the population of Northern Ireland, there was an inverse association between the highest recorded recent activity and total cholesterol (P ≤ 0.01), LDL (P ≤ 0.01), triglyceride(P ≤ 0.05) and Chol:HDL ratio (P ≤ 0.001) in males, and total cholesterol (P ≤ 0.001), LDL (P ≤ 0.001), and triglyceride (P ≤ 0.01) in females; between habitual activity and HDL (P ≤ 0.05) in males and total cholesterol (P≤ 0.05) and triglyceride (P ≤ 0.01) in females. There was a relationship between the highest recorded activity and apoAI (P ≤ 0.01) and apoB (P ≤ 0.01) in males and with apoB (P≤ 0.001) in females; between habitual activity and apoAI (P ≤ 0.01) and apoAII (P ≤ 0.05) in males and apoB (P ≤ 0.01) in females; between past activity and Lp(a) in females (P ≤ 0.05). After adjustment for possible confounding factors, total cholesterol(P ≤ 0.05) and LDL (P ≤ 0.05) were unexpectedly higher in males who were active throughout life. Total cholesterol(P ≤ 0.05) and LDL (P ≤ 0.001) were higher in females with highest recorded activity and triglycerides lower (P≤ 0.05) in those habitually active. An association between highest recorded activity and apoAI (P ≤ 0.01), and past activity and apoAI:apoB ratio (P ≤ 0.05) was shown in males and in females, after adjustment, and between apoB (P ≤ 0.05) and highest recorded activity.

Author Information

Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, The Queen's University of Belfast, Mulhouse Building, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast BT12 6BJ; Policy Planning and Research Unit, Department of Finance and Personnel (NI), Parliament Buildings, Stormont, Belfast; Physical Education Centre, The Queens University of Belfast; and The Laboratory, Ulster Hospital, Dundonald, Belfast

Submitted for publication September 1995.

Accepted for publication February 1996.

We wish to thank Dr. Frank Kee, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, The Queen's University of Belfast, for his helpful advice and criticism.

The Northern Ireland Health and Activity was supported by the Sports Council for Northern Ireland, The Health Promotion Agency for Northern Ireland, Northern Ireland Chest, Heart and Stroke Association, The Department of Health and Social Services (NI), The Department of Education (NI), Save and Prosper, and a number of local councils.

Address for correspondence: Dr. D. MacAuley, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, The Queen's University of Belfast, Mulhouse Building, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast BT12 6BJ, United Kingdom.

©1996The American College of Sports Medicine