Determination of maximal lactate steady state response in selected sports events

BENEKE, RALPH; von DUVILLARD, SERGE PETELIN

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: February 1996 - Volume 28 - Issue 2 - pp 241-246
Applied Sciences: Physical Fitness and Performance

Maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) refers to the upper limit of blood lactate concentration indicating an equilibrium between lactate production and lactate elimination during constant workload. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether different levels of MLSS may explain different blood lactate concentration (BLC) levels at submaximal workload in the sports events of rowing, cycling, and speed skating. Eleven rowers (mean ± SD, age 20.1 ± 1.5 yr, height 188.7 ± 6.2 cm, weight 82.7 ± 8.0 kg), 16 cyclists and triathletes (age 23.6 ± 3.0 yr, height 181.4± 5.6 cm, weight 72.5 ± 6.2 kg), and 6 speed skaters (age 23.3± 6.6 yr, height 179.5 ± 7.5 cm, weight 73.2 ± 5.6 kg) performed an incremental load test to determine maximal workload and several submaximal 30-min constant workloads for MLSS measurement on a rowing ergometer, a cycle ergometer, and on a speed-skating track. Maximal workload was higher (P ≤ 0.05) in rowing (416.8 ± 46.2 W) than in cling (358.6 ± 34.4 W) and speed skating (383.5 ± 40.9 W). The level of MLSS differed (P ≤ 0.001) in rowing (3.1 ± 0.5 mmol·l-1), cycling (5.4 ± 1.0 mmol·l-1), and in speed skating (6.6 ± 0.9 mmol.l-1). MLSS workload was higher (P ≤ 0.05) in rowing (316.2 ± 29.9 W) and speed skating (300.5 ± 43.8 W) than in cycling (257.8 ± 34.6 W). No differences (P > 0.05) in MLSS workload were found between speed skating and rowing. MLSS workload intensity as related to maximal workload was independent (P > 0.05) of the sports event: 76.2% ± 5.7% in rowing, 71.8% ± 4.1% in cycling, and 78.1% ± 4.4% in speed skating. Changes in MLSS do not respond with MLSS workload, the MLSS workload intensity, or with the metabolic profile of the sports event. The observed differences in MLSS and MLSS workload may correspond to the sport-specific mass of working muscle.

Department of Sports Medicine, Free University Berlin, 14195 Berlin, GERMANY; and Department of Exercise and Movement Sciences, William Paterson College, Wayne, NJ 07470

Submitted for publication June 1995.

Accepted for publication November 1995.

Address for correspondence: Serge P. von Duvillard, Ph.D., Department of Exercise and Movement Sciences, William Paterson College, 300 Pompton Road, Wayne, NJ 07470.

©1996The American College of Sports Medicine