Skip Navigation LinksHome > April 1994 - Volume 26 - Issue 4 > Hypervolemia and cycling time trial performance.
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
Physical Fitness and Performance: PDF Only

Hypervolemia and cycling time trial performance.

LUETKEMEIER, MAURIE J.; THOMAS, EVAN L.

Collapse Box

Abstract

Ten experienced cyclists rode three simulated time trials to determine whether hypervolemia was associated with improvements in cycling time trial performance. The conditions were: exercise-induced hypervolemia (ExH), dextran-induced hypervolemia (DxH), and euvolemia (Eu). ExH was induced by 3 d of submaximal cycling lasting an average of 92.9 min at an average relative intensity of 68%. DxH was induced by acute plasma volume expansion with 400 +/- 121 ml of a 6% dextran solution. Compared with Eu, ExH and DxH were associated with 9.4% and 8.7% elevations in blood volume as well as 11.1% and 12.4% elevations in plasma volume, respectively. Performance was significantly improved (P < 0.05) (i.e., target work goal reached earlier) during ExH (81.41 +/- 5.52 min) and DxH (81.36 +/- 5.06 min) than during Eu (90.87 +/- 5.27 min). Average power was significantly higher during E X H (246 +/- 13 W) and DxH (245 +/- 14 W) than during Eu (221 +/- 15 W). There were no significant differences in performance time or average power between the two hyper-volemic conditions. Average sweat rates were significantly elevated during ExH (22.6 +/- 1.4 ml-min-1) and DxH (22.2 +/- 1.6 ml-min-1) than during Eu (20.4 +/- 1.7 ml-min-1). Rectal temperatures rose from approximately 37.2-39.2[degrees]C during each time trial but there were no significant differences in Tre between trials. In conclusion, hypervolemia, whether induced by short-term training or dextran-infusion, had a beneficial effect on performance and average power during simulated time trials lasting approximately 90 min. These improvements in performance were related to hypervolemia rather than other short-term training adaptations.

(C)1994The American College of Sports Medicine

Login

Article Tools

Share

Search for Similar Articles
You may search for similar articles that contain these same keywords or you may modify the keyword list to augment your search.

Connect With Us