Skip Navigation LinksHome > April 1987 - Volume 19 - Issue 2 > Serum [beta]-endorphin levels during a graded exercise test...
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
ORIGINAL INVESTIGATIONS: PDF Only

Serum [beta]-endorphin levels during a graded exercise test to exhaustion.

GOLDFARB, ALLAN H.; HATFIELD, BRADLEY D.; SFORZO, GARY A.; FLYNN, MICHAEL G.

Collapse Box

Abstract

GOLDFARB, A. H., B. D. HATFIELD, G. A. SFORZO, and M. G. FLYNN. Serum [beta]-endorphin levels during a graded exercise test to exhaustion. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc, Vol. 19, No. 2, pp. 78-82, 1987. Nine untrained college age males completed a graded exercise protocol to maximal capacity on a bicycle ergometer to determine if there was a relationship between intensity of exercise and serum [beta]-endorphin ([beta]-EP) levels. Subjects fasted for 12 h and abstained from physical activity at least 24 h prior to testing. Subjects completed the Multiple Affect Adjective Check List prior to and following exercise to ascertain if psychological state would be associated with [beta]-EP levels. The initial workload was 150 kilopond meters and was increased 150 kilopond meters every 3 min until [latin capital V with dot above]O2max or leg fatigue occurred. Expired gases were continuously analyzed, and a venous blood sample was drawn from an indwelling catheter during the final 30 s of each stage and 5-min post-exercise. [beta]-EP levels were determined from serum using a radioimmunoassay technique and corrected for cross-reactivity with [beta]-lipotropin using affinity chromatography. Resting [beta]-EP levels were 25.3 +/- 4.1 pg[middle dot]ml-1 and did not demonstrate significant changes during any stage of exercise. A correlation analysis (r = 0.30) revealed no significant relationship between exercise intensity and [beta]-EP levels. Following exercise, [beta]-EP levels were significantly increased compared to resting values (38.8 +/- 4.8 pg[middle dot]ml-1). In addition, psychological state was unaffected by exercise despite significant increases in recovery [beta]-EP levels. These data support previous studies reporting increases in [beta]-EP levels following exercise, but do not indicate a relationship between intensity of exercise and [beta]-EP levels during graded exercise or peripheral [beta]-EP levels and psychological state.

(C)1987The American College of Sports Medicine

Login

Article Tools

Share

Search for Similar Articles
You may search for similar articles that contain these same keywords or you may modify the keyword list to augment your search.

Connect With Us