Skip Navigation LinksHome > February 1987 - Volume 19 - Issue 1 > Exercise training-induced hypervolemia in the horse.
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
ORIGINAL INVESTIGATIONS: PDF Only

Exercise training-induced hypervolemia in the horse.

MCKEEVER, KENNETH H.; SCHURG, WILLIAM A.; JARRETT, SALLY H.; CONVERTINO, VICTOR A.

Collapse Box

Abstract

MCKEEVER, K. H., W. A. SCHURG, S. H. JARRETT, and V. A. CONVERTINO. Exercise training-induced hypervolemia in the horse. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 19, No. 1, pp. 21-27, 1987. The purpose of this study was to determine if a chronic hypervolemia would accompany endurance exercise training in the horse. Six mature previously inactive horses were utilized for this study. During the 5-wk experiment, five of the horses were trained for 14 d on a treadmill ergometer at a constant treadmill speed of 5.6 km[middle dot]hr-1 and a constant grade of 12.5% for graduated lengths of time. One horse was trained by lunging at a trotting pace in a round pen. Following training, plasma volume increased by 4.7 1 (29.1%, P < 0.05). Although the rate of daily water intake did not change during the training period, 24-h urine output decreased by an average of 3.51[middle dot] d-1 (-24.5%, P < 0.05). Resting glomerular filtration rate and the rate of sodium clearance were not altered by training. However, urea, potassium, and osmotic clearance were decreased by training (P < 0.05) while free water clearance was increased (P < 0.05). Resting plasma aldosterone and arginine vasopressin concentrations were not altered by training. Plasma potassium concentration was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) following the 2 wk of training. These data would appear to suggest that renal control mechanisms affecting water reabsorption via the re-absorption of urea and osmotically active substances other than sodium provide the primary route for the traininginduced hypervolemia seen in horses.

(C)1987The American College of Sports Medicine

Login

Article Tools

Share

Connect With Us