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Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:
ORIGINAL INVESTIGATIONS: PDF Only

Aerobic fitness does not contribute to prediction of orthostatic intolerance.

CONVERTINO, VICTOR A.; SATHER, TOM M.; GOLDWATER, DANIELLE J.; ALFORD, WILLIAM R.

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Abstract

CONVERTINO, V. A., T. M. SATHER, D. J. GOLDWATER and W. R. ALFORD, Aerobic fitness does not contribute to prediction of orthostatic intolerance. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 18, No. 5, pp. 551-556, 1986. Several investigations have suggested that orthostatic tolerance may be inversely related to aerobic fitness (VO2max). To test this hypothesis, 18 males (age 29 to 51 yr) underwent both treadmill VO2max determination and graded lower body negative pressures (LBNP) exposure to tolerance. VO2max was measured during the last minute of a Bruce treadmill protocol. LBNP was terminated based on pre-syncopal symptoms, and LBNP tolerance (peak LBNP) was expressed as the cumulative product of LBNP and time (torr-min). Changes in heart rate; stroke volume, cardiac output, blood pressure, and impedance rheographic indices of mid-thigh-leg fluid accumulation were measured at rest and during the final minute of LBNP. For all 18 subjects, mean (+/-SE) fluid accumulation index and leg venous compliance index at peak LBNP were 139 +/- 22 ml and 3.9 +/- 0.4 ml [middle dot] 100 ml [middle dot] torr-min-2 [middle dot] 103, respectively. Pearson product-moment correlations and step-wise linear regression were used to investigate relationships with peak LBNP. Variables associated with endurance training, such as VO2max and percent body fat, were not found to correlate significantly (P < 0.05) with peak LBNP and did not add sufficiently to the prediction of peak LBNP to be included in the step-wise regression model. The step-wise regression model included only fluid accumulation index, leg venous compliance index, and blood volume, and resulted in a squared multiple correlation coefficient of 0.978. These data do not support the hypothesis that orthostatic tolerance as measured by LBNP is lower in individuals with high aerobic fitness.

(C)1986The American College of Sports Medicine

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