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HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING: A Review of Physiological and Psychological Responses

Kilpatrick, Marcus W.; Jung, Mary E.; Little, Jonathan P.

doi: 10.1249/FIT.0000000000000067
Features

Learning Objectives:

* Develop an understanding of the impacts of high-intensity interval training on physiological and psychological responses.

* • Develop a strategy for prescribing and using high-intensity interval training in varied client, member, and patient populations.

High-intensity interval training is a proven method of boosting aerobic fi tness, metabolic health, and cardiovascular function, but more research is needed to confi rm preliminary results suggesting that it may be more desirable psychologically than vigorous continuous exercise.

Marcus W. Kilpatrick, Ph.D., is an associate professor of Exercise Science in the School of Physical Education and Exercise Science at the University of South Florida. His education is in the areas of nutrition, kinesiology, and health education. His research interests include physical activity motivation, perceived exertion, and mood.

Mary E. Jung, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of Exercise Science in the School of Health and Exercise Sciences at the University of British Columbia at Okanagan. Her education is in the areas of kinesiology and exercise psychology. Her research interests include self-regulation of health behaviors such as physical activity, diet, and smoking..

Jonathan P. Little, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of Exercise Science in the School of Health and Exercise Sciences at the University of British Columbia at Okanagan. His education is in kinesiology where he specializes in exercise physiology. His research interests focus on the impact of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes on metabolic health..

Disclosure: The authors declare no conflicts of interest and do not have any financial disclosures.

© 2014 American College of Sports Medicine.