Share this article on:

THE USE OF VIBRATION EXERCISE IN CLINICAL POPULATIONS

Tomás, Rita M.D.; Lee, Vinson M.S.; Going, Scott Ph.D.

doi: 10.1249/FIT.0b013e31823373e8
Features

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: • Describe whole body vibration exercise.

• Understand the rationale for the use of vibration exercise.

• Understand current evidence in support of vibration exercise in clinical populations.

• Understand the basic guidelines for prescription of vibration exercise.

Vibration exercise, which has gained in popularity in the athletic training and fitness settings, may be an efficacious alternative form of exercise for patients with neurological and musculoskeletal conditions. This article gives an overview of vibration exercise, discusses the rationale underlying its use in clinical populations, and summarizes the current literature.

Rita Tomás, M.D., is a physician specializing in physical medicine and rehabilitation in Lisbon, Portugal, and a Fulbright Visiting Researcher at The University of Arizona. Her research focuses on the effects of exercise on bone, muscle, and physical function.

Vinson Lee, M.S., is a research specialist in the Department of Physiology at The University of Arizona. His research interests are in physical activity, sarcopenia, obesity, and diabetes.

Scott Going, Ph.D., is a professor in the Departments of Nutritional Sciences and Physiological Sciences and is the director of the Center for Physical Activity and Nutrition at The University of Arizona. His research interests include development of methods and models for body composition assessment; changes in body composition during growth and development in children and aging in older adults; and the effects of exercise and diet on bone, soft tissue composition, functional capacity, and health.

Disclosure: Dr. Tomás is a recipient of a Fulbright Visiting Researcher Scholarship (2009–2010).

Disclosure: Dr. Tomás is a recipient of a Fulbright Visiting Researcher Scholarship (2009–2010).

© 2011 American College of Sports Medicine.