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Metabolic Adaptations to Short-term High-Intensity Interval Training: A Little Pain for a Lot of Gain?

Gibala, Martin J.1; McGee, Sean L.2

Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews: April 2008 - Volume 36 - Issue 2 - p 58-63
doi: 10.1097/JES.0b013e318168ec1f
Articles

High-intensity interval training (HIT) is a potent time-efficient strategy to induce numerous metabolic adaptations usually associated with traditional endurance training. As little as six sessions of HIT over 2 wk or a total of only approximately 15 min of very intense exercise (~600 kJ), can increase skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and endurance performance and alter metabolic control during aerobic-based exercise.

High-intensity interval training is a potent, time-efficient strategy to induce numerous metabolic adaptations usually associated with traditional endurance training.

1Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; and 2Department of Physiology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Address for correspondence: Martin J. Gibala, Ph.D., Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, 1280 Main St West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4K1 (E-mail: gibalam@mcmaster.ca).

Accepted for publication: October 4, 2007.

Associate Editor: Mark Hargreaves, Ph.D., FACSM.

©2008 The American College of Sports Medicine