Caffeine, Fluid-Electrolyte Balance, Temperature Regulation, and Exercise-Heat Tolerance

Armstrong, Lawrence E.; Casa, Douglas J.; Maresh, Carl M.; Ganio, Matthew S.

Exercise & Sport Sciences Reviews:
doi: 10.1097/jes.0b013e3180a02cc1
Articles
Abstract

Dietitians, exercise physiologists, athletic trainers, and other sports medicine personnel commonly recommend that exercising adults and athletes refrain from caffeine use because it is a diuretic, and it may exacerbate dehydration and hyperthermia. This review, contrary to popular beliefs, proposes that caffeine consumption does not result in the following: (a) water-electrolyte imbalances or hyperthermia and (b) reduced exercise-heat tolerance.

In Brief

Authorities recommend that we avoid caffeine. Does caffeine use result in a fluid-electrolyte imbalance, hyperthemia, or heat intolerance?

Author Information

Departments of Kinesiology and Nutritional Sciences, Human Performance Laboratory, University of Connecticut, CT, United States

Address for correspondence: Lawrence E. Armstrong, Ph.D., FACSM, Departments of Kinesiology and Nutritional Sciences, Human Performance Laboratory, University of Connecticut, Unit 1110, 2095 Hillside Road Storrs, CT 06269-1110 (E-mail: lawrence.armstrong@uconn.edu).

Accepted for publication: April 20, 2007.

Associate Editor: Gordon Warren, Ph.D., FACSM.

©2007 The American College of Sports Medicine