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Current Sports Medicine Reports:
doi: 10.1249/JSR.0000000000000031
ACSM Clinician Profile

ACSM Clinician Profile

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The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) is proud to feature Pierre A. d’Hemecourt, MD, FACSM, in this issue’s Clinician Profile. Dr. d’Hemecourt received his doctorate at Georgetown University School of Medicine. After completing his residency in orthopedics and general surgery at Georgetown University Hospital and Emergency Medicine at Norfolk General Hospital, Dr. d’Hemecourt finished a fellowship in sports medicine at Children’s Hospital in 1997 and became the director of primary care sports medicine there in 1998. Currently he works at Children’s Hospital, Boston, in the Division of Sports Medicine. In addition, Dr. d’Hemecourt has served as team physician for Boston College since 1997 and is involved in many different sporting events throughout Massachusetts. He has served as co-medical director of the Boston Marathon since 2005. He is also a fellow of ACSM and recently has joined the Editorial Board for Current Sports Medicine Reports.

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You Have Been an ACSM Member Since 1994. How Has ACSM Grown and Changed Since You Became a Member?

I think ACSM really has evolved as an excellent interdisciplinary education tool for the care and prevention of injury in both athletic and nonathletic populations. ACSM really has given strong impetus to the value of exercise across all populations including those with medical problems.

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What Was It Like to Be a Clinician a Decade or Two Ago Compared with Today?

A decade ago, the emphasis on prevention of injury was just starting. We are seeing a much greater clinical involvement now. Previously, we were often reactive to injury. A prime example is anterior cruciate ligament. Thanks to the biomechanists and multiple disciplines, this injury is on the minds of clinicians much more during preparticipation examinations. Furthermore today’s clinician is much more likely to utilize biomechanics considerations in both the prevention and treatment of injury. Running is another example where biomechanical interest in impact forces has driven the management of lower extremity stress injuries in the athlete. Prevention of medical problems also has reached attention. While there is much work to do, concussion prevention is high on the clinicians’ priority list. Endurance athletic events such as marathons are now heavily involved in prevention of serious medical problems such as hyponatremia, hyperthermia, and sudden death. Medical personnel involved in these events place heavy emphasis on education to both the runners and medical staff. Medical care of the athlete today requires a very proactive involvement of the medical community.

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How Has Membership in ACSM Influenced Your Career?

ACSM has been very instrumental in making me consider the multidisciplinary aspect of athlete care and prevention. Since the well-being of the athlete requires care from multiple backgrounds, I really have gained from being collaborative. It is this open sense that really allows advancement of knowledge and care.

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How Do You Use the ACSM Network in Your Daily Work?

I am constantly interacting with other ACSM members in the referral of patient care and research development of best practice methods. For instance, in endurance athletes, we have been working on the development of evidence-based guidelines in the care of these athletes. Additionally the collaborative effect involving ACSM members nationally and internationally has been exciting and invaluable.

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What Is Your Best Advice to Other Sports Medicine Clinicians?

My advice to those involved in athletic care is to be involved in ACSM and its regional chapters. It is a great mechanism for collaborative work and research. I also would place a large emphasis on being involved in the growth of biomechanical assessment of athletic injury.

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Where Do You See ACSM Heading in the Future?

I believe you will see further growth in international involvement over the next 10 years. As experienced with endurance athletes, the power of larger scale population studies is very useful.

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Would You Like to Share Anything Else with the Readers of Current Sports Medicine Reports?

As we stay very busy in our practices, we look for ways to be efficient. ACSM has provided a very efficacious mechanism to remain connected and collaborative with various clinicians involved in athletic care. Best care practices are very visible and useful to the sports medicine clinician.

Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Sports Medicine

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