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Encouraging Student Interest in Teaching Through a Medical Student Teaching Competition

DeSimone, Ariadne K. MD, MPH; Haydek, John P. MD; Sudduth, Christopher L. MD; LaBarbera, Vincent MD; Desai, Yaanik; Reinertsen, Erik; Manning, Kimberly D. MD

doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000001491
Innovation Reports

Problem Clinician educators have realized the value not only of assigning teaching roles to medical students but also of offering explicit training in how to teach effectively. Despite this interest in the development of medical students’ teaching skills, formal teaching instruction and opportunities for practice are lacking.

Approach To encourage medical student interest in teaching, the authors developed and implemented a medical student teaching competition (MSTC) at Emory University School of Medicine during the summers of 2014, 2015, and 2016. Each year, eight student finalists were each paired with a physician “teaching coach” and given one month to prepare for the MSTC. During the competition, each finalist delivered an eight-minute presentation to a panel of seven physician and resident judges. The authors describe the development, implementation, and assessment of the MSTC.

Outcomes Approximately 150 medical students and faculty members attended the MSTC each year. The students in attendance felt that the MSTC made them more likely to seek out opportunities to learn how to teach effectively and to practice teaching. Additionally, some students are now more interested in learning about a career in academic medicine than they were before the MSTC.

Next Steps Given the need for more formal initiatives dedicated to improving the teaching skills of doctors-in-training, including medical students, innovative solutions such as the MSTC may enhance a medical school’s existing curriculum and encourage student interest in teaching. The MSTC model may be generalizable to other medical schools.

A.K. DeSimone is a first-year resident, Transitional Year Program, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.

J.P. Haydek is a first-year categorical resident, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.

C.L. Sudduth is a first-year categorical resident, Department of Surgery, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon.

V. LaBarbera is a first-year resident, Preliminary Medicine Program, Department of Medicine, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island.

Y. Desai is a fourth-year medical student, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.

E. Reinertsen is a fifth-year MD/PhD student, Emory University School of Medicine and Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia.

K.D. Manning is associate professor, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, program director, Transitional Year Program, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, and attending physician, Grady Health System, Atlanta, Georgia.

Funding/Support: Funding for the medical student teaching competition was provided by the Medical Student Senate at the Emory University School of Medicine and by Dr. J. William Eley.

Other disclosures: None reported.

Ethical approval: The Emory University institutional review board (Atlanta, Georgia) reviewed the research proposal and granted an exempt research determination because the research was determined not to be in the purview of human subjects research.

Correspondence should be addressed to Kimberly D. Manning, Department of Medicine, Grady Health System, 49 Jesse Hill Jr Dr., Atlanta, GA 30303; telephone: (404) 778-1619; e-mail: kdmanni@emory.edu; Twitter: @gradydoctor.

© 2017 by the Association of American Medical Colleges