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Academic Medicine:
doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000000447
Research Report: PDF Only

Assessing Effective Teaching: What Medical Students Value When Developing Evaluation Instruments.

Pettit, Jeffrey E. PhD; Axelson, Rick D. PhD; Ferguson, Kristi J. PhD; Rosenbaum, Marcy E. PhD

Published Ahead-of-Print
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Abstract

Purpose: To investigate what criteria medical students would value and use in assessing teaching skills.

Method: Fourth-year medical students at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine enrolled in a teaching elective course are required to design and use an evaluation instrument to assess effective teaching. Each class uses a similar process in developing their instruments. Since the first class in spring 2007, 193 medical students have created 36 different instruments. Three faculty evaluation experts conducted a thematic analysis of the instruments and coded the information according to what was being evaluated and what types of ratings were indicated. The data were submitted to a fourth faculty reviewer, who synthesized the information and adjusted the codes to better capture the data. Common themes and categories were detected.

Results: Four themes were identified: content (instructor knowledgeable, teaches at level of learner, practical information), learning environment, teacher personal attributes, and teaching methods. Thirty-two descriptors were distinguished across the 36 instruments. Thirteen descriptors were present in 50% or more of the instruments. The most common rating systems were Likert scales and open comments.

Conclusions: Fourth-year medical students can offer an eclectic resource for evaluating teaching in the classroom and the clinic. Using the descriptors that were identified in greater than 50% of the evaluation instruments will provide effective measures that can be incorporated into medical teacher evaluation instruments.

(C) 2014 by the Association of American Medical Colleges

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