Home Current Issue Previous Issues Published Ahead-of-Print Collections For Authors Journal Info
Skip Navigation LinksHome > November 2012 - Volume 87 - Issue 11 > Are Disadvantaged and Underrepresented Minority Applicants M...
Academic Medicine:
doi: 10.1097/ACM.0b013e31826d6220
Diversity and Inclusion in Academic Medicine

Are Disadvantaged and Underrepresented Minority Applicants More Likely to Apply to the Program in Medical Education–Health Equity?

Bailey, Jacob A.; Willies-Jacobo, Lindia J. MD

Collapse Box

Abstract

Purpose: To determine whether underrepresented minority (URM) students and students from disadvantaged backgrounds were more likely to apply to a combined MD–master’s degree program designed to train physician leaders in providing care to underserved communities.

Method: University of California, San Diego (UCSD), School of Medicine applications from the 2008–2010 incoming classes were analyzed. American Medical College Application Service and UCSD secondary application data were used to build a logistic regression model to determine which characteristics were most associated with applying to the MD–master’s degree Program in Medical Education–Health Equity (PRIME-HEq).

Results: Of the total UCSD applications reviewed from disadvantaged students, 61.5% also applied to PRIME-HEq (319/519) compared with 23.5% of nondisadvantaged students (917/3,895, χ2 = 326.665, P < .001). Of URM student applications, 55.6% also applied to PRIME-HEq (358/644) compared with 23.3% of non-URM students (878/3,770, χ2 = 284.654, P < .001). Results of a backward stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that disadvantagedstatus was the greatest predictor of applying to PRIME-HEq (odds ratio = 3.15; 95%confidence interval = 2.50–3.966; P< .001).

Conclusions: URM students and students from disadvantaged backgrounds were more likely to be interested in a curriculum designed to train them to work with underserved communities. These results suggest that PRIME-HEq, or similarly focused programs, may influence URM and disadvantaged students’ application decisions.

© 2012 Association of American Medical Colleges

Login

Article Tools

Share