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Multi-institutional Development and Utilization of a Computer-Assisted Learning Program for the Pediatrics Clerkship: The CLIPP Project

Fall, Leslie H. MD; Berman, Norman B. MD; Smith, Sherilyn MD; White, Christopher B. MD; Woodhead, Jerold C. MD; Olson, Ardis L. MD

Academic Medicine:
Article
Abstract

Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) holds significant promise for meeting the current challenges of medical education by providing consistent and quality teaching materials regardless of training site. The Computer-assisted Learning in Pediatrics Project (CLIPP) was created over three years (2000–2003) to meet this potential through multi-institutional development of interactive Internet-based patient simulations that comprehensively teach the North American core pediatrics clerkship curriculum.

Project development adhered to four objectives: (1) comprehensive coverage of the core curriculum; (2) uniform approach to CAI pedagogy; (3) multi-institutional development by educators; and (4) extensive evaluation by users. Pediatrics clerkship directors from 30 institutions worked in teams to develop a series of 31 patient case simulations. An iterative process of case content and pedagogy development, case authoring, peer review, and pilot-testing ensured that the needs of clerkship directors and medical students were met.

Fifty medical schools in the United States and Canada are presently using CLIPP. More than 8,000 students have completed over 98,000 case sessions, with an average of 2,000 case sessions completed per week at this time. Each CLIPP case has been completed by more than 3,000 students. The current cost of CLIPP development is approximately $70 per student user, or $6 per case session.

The project’s success demonstrates that multi-institutional development and implementation of a peer-reviewed comprehensive CAI learning program by medical educators is feasible and provides a useful model for other organizations to develop similar programs. Although CAI development is both time-consuming and costly, the initial investment decreases significantly with broad use over time.

Author Information

Dr. Fall is vice-chair for pediatric education and associate professor of pediatrics, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, New Hampshire.

Dr. Berman is associate professor of pediatrics, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, New Hampshire.

Dr. Smith is assistant professor of pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington.

Dr. White is professor of pediatrics, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia.

Dr. Woodhead is the Sahai Family Associate Professor of Medical Education and of Pediatrics, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa.

Dr. Olson is associate professor of pediatrics, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, New Hampshire.

Correspondence should be addressed to Dr. Fall, Department of Pediatrics, DHMC, One Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, NH 03756; email: 〈Leslie.H.Fall@Hitchcock.org〉.

© 2005 Association of American Medical Colleges