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Facilitating Faculty Success: Outcomes and Cost Benefit of the UCSD National Center of Leadership in Academic Medicine

Wingard, Deborah L.; Garman, Karen A.; Reznik, Vivian

Section Editor(s): Stern, David MD

Academic Medicine:
Papers: Professional Development
Abstract

Problem and Background. In 1998, the University of California San Diego (UCSD) was selected as one of four National Centers of Leadership in Academic Medicine (NCLAM) to develop a structured mentoring program for junior faculty.

Method. Participants were surveyed at the beginning and end of the seven-month program, and one-four years after. The institution provided financial information. Four primary outcomes associated with participation in NCLAM were assessed: whether participants stayed at UCSD, whether they stayed in academic medicine, improved confidence in skills, and cost-effectiveness.

Results. Among 67 participants, 85% remained at UCSD and 93% in academic medicine. Their confidence in skills needed for academic success improved: 53% personal leadership, 19% research, 33% teaching, and 76% administration. Given improved retention rates, savings in recruitment was greater than cost of the program.

Conclusions. Structured mentoring can be a cost-effective way to improve skills needed for academic success and retention in academic medicine.

Author Information

Partially supported by the Office of Women's Health, U.S. Public Health Service (Grant #282–98-0051), and the Health Resources and Services Administration, U.S. Public Health Service (Grant #5 D34 HPO2060)

Correspondence: Deborah L. Wingard, PhD, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0607; e-mail: 〈dwingard@ucsd.edu.〉

© 2004 Association of American Medical Colleges